Modern Geometric Sideboard and Credenza Roundup

Roundup - Modern Geometric Sideboards or Credenzas

Have I ever told you the story of how this modern geometric sideboard, above, came into my life?

No? Well, today I shall.

I spent – and I’m not even exaggerating when I say this – three years searching Facebook Marketplace for a piece like this. Everything I came across was either in the thousands’ price range, or it got snatched up before I could even say, “Geometric sideboard!”

Roundup - Modern Geometric Sideboards or Credenzas

Love at First Sight

One Friday evening, back in 2020, I was scrolling aimlessly through Facebook Marketplace before bed – as one does – when a new listing for “vintage home items” popped up, and I decided to swipe through the photos. That is when I discovered the photo below.

Roundup - Modern Geometric Sideboards or Credenzas

“I need that credenza in my life! Can I pick it up tomorrow?” I immediately messaged the seller.

Completely normal behavior, right? No need to be alarmed, I’m a perfectly sane person who’s spent only three years looking for this exact piece.

The seller responded, saying she had more than 25 people interested in it. One thing lead to another, and before I knew it, we were loading our toddlers into our F150 bright and early the next morning to drive 1 hour and 18 minutes to Oakridge, Tennessee.

The person selling the piece said the sideboard had belonged to their relatives, one of whom passed away in 2013 and the other in 2019. Some other interesting information was shared, like the fact that the sideboard dates back to the 1940s. I was also told that the late gentleman who owned this credenza was an engineer at the Oakridge nuclear facility in Tennessee.

I imagine that if furniture could talk, this one would have quite the stories to share.

Roundup - Modern Geometric Sideboards or Credenzas

More Discoveries

Once we got the sideboard home, I was cleaning it when I found one of those vintage address sticker labels with what I assume is the previous owner’s name and the address where we had picked up the sideboard. The name was “F.P. Jeffers.” Of course, I couldn’t resist that rabbit hole, so searching I went. A quick Google search revealed a 2013 obituary for Fred Palmer Jeffers, Sr. from Oakridge, Tennessee.

“A giant of a man has fallen,” it read, “but trusting Jesus as his Savior, his spirit lives on at home with God.”

Jeffers was born in Oneida, TN on August 1, 1927. After serving in the U.S. Navy at the end of the war, he came to work at DOE, Y-12, and ORNL in Oak Ridge until his retirement. While at ORNL he received an R&D award for his work in Ceramics Lab. Fred lived in Oak Ridge with his family for over 64 years, where he had served on the Oak Ridge Planning Commission, was a long-time member of Glenwood Baptist Church, taught a RA’s group of boys at church, worked as a volunteer tax preparer for seniors in his retirement, and he was fondly known to his neighbors as always ready to lend a helping hand.”

Another click lead me to his wife, Cora Jeffers’, obituary from 2019.

“Maxine was born 91 years ago on a rural farm in Campbell County as the youngest of nine children, always grateful for the loving Christian home her preacher father and praying mother provided,” the obituary reads.

“At 17, during the war, she went to live and work in Oak Ridge for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). There she met and married her handsome husband Fred Jeffers. Together they lived in Oak Ridge for almost 70 years and raised their three children. Besides being a devoted homemaker, Maxine trained and worked as a nurse at Oak Ridge Hospital for a few years. She felt the greatest calling of her life was to serve her Lord Jesus Christ and so she loved teaching God’s Word in various home Bible studies and Sunday School classes. Maxine was a long-time member of Glenwood Baptist Church. Her prayers and the example of her life profoundly influenced her family and many friends.”

Roundup - Modern Geometric Sideboards or Credenzas

Thrifting, History and Life Lessons

Please tell me I’m not the only one who finds such stories incredibly fascinating.

Half of the thrill of thrifting, for me, is discovering the history of a piece. I often imagine the people that must’ve owned the antique pieces I buy. What were they like? Why did they buy this piece? How did it serve them?

It sounds like the Jeffers were a lovely family, and I imagine they were wonderful hosts. We do know they held Bible studies in their home, and I can’t help but wonder how many people have this very credenza in the background of their own photos.

Perhaps the Jeffers’ credenza housed a record player much like our own – but better, because they just don’t make them like they used to. Maybe it contained serverware for the regular gatherings hosted in their home. Maybe the credenza held national secrets related to Jeffers’ line of work.

I will never know, but isn’t it fun to imagine? But more than that, isn’t it interesting to find similarities between us and them, despite generations separating us?

I also can’t help but wonder, what will the newspapers write about me, when it’s my turn to meet my maker? Will they write, “She was always ready to lend a helping hand?” Or perhaps, “…Devout homemaker, her greatest calling was to serve her Lord Jesus Christ.” Or better yet, “Her prayers and the example of her life profoundly influenced her family and many friends..”

When, generations later, a complete stranger will message one of my children, “I must have that credenza!,” – will they wonder who owned it before? What she did? How she lived? Whether she made a difference?

My fascination doesn’t stop with old furniture, either. I equally love old houses that have a history, which is probably why I was so onboard with buying our abandoned 1930 bungalow back in 2015.

Remind me to share that story another day…

Roundup - Modern Geometric Sideboards or Credenzas

Geometric Sideboard Roundup

Back to the topic at hand. Every time I share my geometric sideboard on Instagram, I get a dozen questions, like “Where is it from?” and “Where did you buy it?” It recently dawned on me: I must give the people what they want!

So, that’s how this blog post was born. Per your request, I’ve scoured the entire Internet and am sharing the prettiest modern geometric sideboard and credenza roundup. Once you see how much these pieces sell for, you’ll know why I had to wait three years for mine.

The prices range from $1,489 for number 4 all the way to $5,895 for number 8. Size-wise, mine is most like number 3. However, looks-wise, I’d say number 4 resembles mine the most. Do keep in mind that prices fluctuate all the time. So, I take no responsibility for retailers’ price changes.

It is a special gem – one I will keep forever.

Roundup - Modern Geometric Sideboards or Credenzas

  1. 61″ Mango Wood Buffet Table, Wayfair, $3,025
  2. 72″ Micah Sideboard, Frontgate, $1,899
  3. 76″ Quinn 3-Door Sideboard, McGee & Co., $5,235
  4. 58″ Sheesham Wood Sideboard, Wayfair, $1,489
  5. 41″ Media Credenza, Perigold, $1,900
  6. 72″ Rio Sideboard, France & Son, $1,519
  7. 68″ Textured Chester Buffet, Anthropologie, $1,998
  8. 74″ Modern Geometric Sideboard, 1st Dibs, $5,895
  9. 72″ Buffet Cabinet, Pottery Barn, $1,499
  10. 82″ Raffael Carved Wood Media Console, Crate & Barrel, $1,799

Tell me: which sideboard is your favorite? Tag me on Instagram if you buy one of these – I’d love to see! Would you like to see a credenza styling post next?

As always, leave your comments or questions below. If you have any requests for future blog posts, or design questions you’d like answered, let me know, and I’ll do my best to address those in a future post!

Looking for more inspiration? Check out the following:

Posted in GREENFIELD REMODEL, HOME DECOR and tagged .

2 Comments

  1. Oh, good. I’m not the only one who goes down the people rabbit hole. Yes, I wonder also. Even old pots and pans. What was cooked in them? What conversions took place while making it; eating it. What were there struggles and joys. So many stories. So many lives.

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